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Ira Koretsky
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Yesterday while meeting with a client and reviewing his LinkedIn profile, we were talking about how he can demonstrate his skills and, past performance. And how to do so with recommendations, which he only had two. While we were strategizing on a plan to request tailored recommendations, he asked, "Do you know how to send these recommendations easily?" I smiled and said, "yes I do."

I thought to share how as this week's tip.

One of the best reasons to use this LinkedIn hack is for job seekers, recruiters, and HR teams to easily view a candidate's recommendations for his/her ENTIRE profile with one click rather than having to search a person's profile, job-by-job.

A not-so-obvious reason is for organizations to demonstrate excellent customer service, past performance, etc. to prospective customers, partners, etc. Organizations should link to team member profiles with the representative recommendations.

Here's how:

1) Log-in to your LinkedIn profile
2) Click on the [Profile] menu option, top left of your screen, close to the blue LinkedIn logo
3) Scroll down to your summary information. This is the box with your picture, name, professional headline, etc.
4) Look at the bottom left of your summary box for a gray LinkedIn logo and a URL (see orange arrow below). This is your public profile URL.

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5) Copy your public profile URL, paste it into your browswer, then add #recommendations at the very end. Press and you'll see just your recommendations for all of your employement history. This is how the URL would look to view my recommendations.

https://www.linkedin.com/in/thechiefstoryteller#recommendations


Note:  If your LinkedIn profile is outside the United States, delete the country letters from your profile URL.

If you have any trouble email me.

 

Source:  I found the original article here (Showcase Imagery) and simplified it above for you.

 

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During a facilitation session to develop a new mission statement for a non-profit client, several of the executive team members encouraged the group to use “strive.”

We politely pointed out strive is a wishy-washy word, and should not be used.

The Merriam-Webster Dictionary states the definition of strive as “to try very hard to do or achieve something.” The implication is you achieve your goal. In reality, you may or may not.

In business, like Yoda from Star Wars aptly said, “Do. Or do not. There is no try.”

Avoid wishy-washy words such as strive, hope, surely, chiefly, usually, going to, often, sort of, possibly, and many more.

Words like these reduce your effectiveness when communicating with your stakeholders.

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Elmer Wheeler said, “Your first 10 words are more important than your next 10,000. In fact, if your first 10 words aren't the right words, you won't have a chance to use the next 10,000.”

Wheeler is one of the fathers of sales. Perhaps you know him from the famous phrase, “Sell the sizzle, not the steak,” which he coined in the 1940s?

Starting your presentation is one of the most important parts to a successful speaker and audience experience. The beginning sets the tone. The beginning puts your audience into a frame of mind. And the beginning sets up the expectations for what’s to come.

Your beginning should be well thought-out and rehearsed. It should grab them in the first 10 seconds. A great quote works very well. Everyone loves a great quote as it has a lot of meaning shared in just a few words.

Whether you realize it or not, the quotes you use are a reflection of who you are and how you think. As such, only use quotes that have had a profound impact on your thinking. Now when you share the quote with your audience, share a little story about how you discovered the quote and its impact on your life. Your audience will “feel” the authenticity in your story and better appreciate the quote’s message.

Here are a few sites to find great quotes:

- BrainyQuote
- World of Quotes
- Quoteland

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Imagine you are attending an event with a speaker or panel. It was fantastic. The line to talk to the speaker is long and you just don’t have the time to wait.

Here’s a tip that works most of the time.

Email the speaker explaining a) You attended the session and b1) You have a question about the topic he/she did cover or b2) You have a question about a topic he/she said would be covered (this option gets more responses by far).

Keep your request short and to the point. Ask for websites, articles, studies, SlideShare presentations, etc. to help address your question.

Perhaps this is a start of a new relationship...

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Have you ever thought that someone else or some other organization has copied your website?  Using your LinkedIn profile picture? Incorporated your amazing graphic into their website?

It happens...

TinEye and Google Images are free sites that scour the Internet in just a few seconds showing you where your image or photo is being used. You can then determine if it is legitimate or if legal steps need to be taken. This is commonly called "Reverse Image Search."

At a minimum, search for uses of your profile pictures and key images/graphics important to your brand identity.

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Expand your network by attending an event of your choice this week. For this event, your goal is to meet one new connection--partner or colleague—not a prospect.

This experience is geared toward expanding your network by building relationships. Each new person you bring into your network has his or her own network of people—likely several hundred. Instead of “qualifying,” get to know people. Think of it more as a Saturday afternoon party. Perhaps even offer some assistance in the form of referrals, suggestions, and introductions?

The true genius of networking is “who knows you.” With today’s world of LinkedIn, it becomes, “who is connected to you.” The power of relationships lay with the person on the other end of the connection.

As a result, a referral from this new business friend comes with a tremendous amount of relationship capital with his/her network. And the same when it comes to your introductions into your network.

 

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Did you know LinkedIn has a plug-in for Outlook 2003, 2007, and 2010?

It seamlessly blends into Outlook. While in email, a person’s profile picture is automatically displayed in your People Pane View, whether they are one of your connections or not. Want to add the person, simply click on the green + adjacent to the picture, and the person will be invited to join your network.

Keep in mind, you can NOT personalize the invitation. The person will receive the plain vanilla invite.

LinkedIn Benefits include (from the site):
- Access Your Connections in Your Inbox:  See the latest LinkedIn activity and profile photo from any connection that sends you an e-mail.
- E-mail Your Connections Directly:  Just start typing a name and let the LinkedIn Outlook Connector fill in the rest.
- Keep Building Your Network:  Instantly send an invitation to connect from any Outlook e-mail.

Download it here
http://www.linkedin.com/static?key=microsoft_outlook

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Having traveled around the world both on vacation and speaking, I have come across a variety of interesting food names:

- Chicken with wilted spinach
- Stinky tofu
- Vegetarian meatballs

You may have heard, even tried some of these. By themselves, do the titles immediately make you think “yummy?” or do you mentally cringe? Personally, I cringed at "wilted spinach." Why would I order something out of date or not fresh? Because this was served at a very nice restaurant, I laughed out loud. It sparked quite an interesting conversation with my dining partners.

Quite unintended, I ended up liking the phrase wilted spinach quite a lot as a metaphor for bad messaging. As a result, I titled our approach to testing messages, “The Wilted Spinach Test.” At its core, the test looks to evaluate whether your words/messages resonate with your target audiences. At a detailed level, do your words/messages mean what you want them to mean? Words matter. A lot. To some, one word could be positive and to others, the very same word could be negative.

Do your written, spoken, and social media communications cause audiences to ask good questions, contact you, or skip right past you?

Monday, January 26, 2015

Words to Avoid - “Anxious”

altFor business communications, you should avoid using the word “anxious.” Anxious is a word all too often misused. You’ll hear people saying, “I’m anxious to meet Julie.” Or “I’m really anxious about xyz.”

By definition, anxious means: “characterized by extreme uneasiness of mind or brooding fear about some contingency” (Merriam-Webster Online).

For business communications, always use “eager.” By definition, eager means: “marked by enthusiastic or impatient desire or interest” (Merriam-Webster Online).

If there is a cause to use “anxious” to convey worry, we suggest using “concern” or “concerned.”

Since all of your business communications to your target audiences are related to your relationship and what you offer to them, choose your words carefully.

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Imagine you arrive at a lunchtime networking event. It takes place in a hotel conference room, comfortably sitting 150 people.

As you enter through the main doors, you briefly stop to survey the room. “Where do I sit?” you ask yourself.

If you are like many people, you follow human nature and seek out comfort and safety. This means you seek out people you know—friends, colleagues, perhaps someone you met before. No longer...

To be successful at business networking, you should be stretching your comfort and safety zones.

At your next event, only sit with strangers.

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In today's go-go-go world, people want and demand information to be on point. Once you get the reader's attention, you can offer more details.

We suggest writing all of your emails smart phone-friendly. These types of emails are fewer than 100 words and take 15 to 30 seconds to read.

Need to send a lengthy email? Break it into two parts. The first part should be the short version, summarizing your key points. The second part offers the details and goes below your signature line

One of the most common questions/statements we receive about storytelling is "I just don't know where to begin."

Choosing the right story, turning it into an engaging experience, and practicing to be a great storyteller of course takes time. What really doesn't take much time and very little preparation, is telling a “Today Story.”

It is an experience that happened to you the day of your presentation, before you begin.

Share your experiences:
- Airplane ride
- Conversation you had with someone previously (at the opening event night before is also a good source),
- Taxi cab ride from the airport with the person sitting next you
- Conversation you had with your spouse, child, parent
- "I was just talking to FirstName" about (a participant in the audience)

In three minutes or less, YOU CAN tell a great story. One that is relevant and interesting. And one that sets the stage for a great presentation to come to your audience.

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